World Literature A

Why This Class

Stories lie at the bedrock of human civilization—and for your student to play an active role in society, they need to understand the stories that define how people think and live. With that in mind, this course introduces your student to the myths and legends that have shaped the western world.

With the guidance of a mentor, students in this course explore some of humanity’s earliest and most influential works of literature. They examine each one’s historical context, legacy, and insights into human nature. Mentors place a special emphasis on the “hero” archetype that appears as a recurring theme through each work. In turn, students apply that framework as a tool to enhance their life stories. Through rigorous discussions and writing projects, students also elevate their reasoning and communication skills to a new level.

By participating in this course, students awaken to the impact of great stories on the structure of society itself.

Overarching Questions

What are the myths and origin stories of other cultures?

What can Shakespeare teach me about love?

What does it mean to be a hero?

What is the Hero Myth Cycle and how does it help me better understand literature?

What gives a great story its staying power?

Reading List

The Odyssey by Homer*

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte*

Beowulf by Anonymous*

Hamlet by William Shakespeare*

*Free versions of these books are provided in electronic format.

Course Details

Recommended Grade: 12th (Senior)

Prerequisites: None

Estimated Weekly Hours: 5 (Classic), 7 (Honors)

Format: Live, self-paced

Credits: 0.5

*No prerequisites are required to enroll in Independent Math. However, students should master foundational concepts before moving on to the next level of math. Please contact our Customer Support Team at support@williamsburglearning.com if you have questions.
Please note that program and course descriptions are subject to change as we continuously improve our curriculum throughout the year.